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Chicago Blizzard field recordings: January 1967 snow-in ; part 1

BROADCAST: May. 13, 1967 | DURATION: 00:30:43

Synopsis

Terkel discussing the snow-in in Chicago in January 1967. Interviewee talks about how the human interaction differs during a blizzard then on a clear day.

Transcript

Tap within the transcript to jump to that part of the audio.

OK

Studs Terkel Day night and this Friday evening. What comes to your mind? First thought.

Man #1 About the snow?

Studs Terkel Yeah.

Man #1 Actually, I just came into town. It, you know, it's, you know, it's what you read and hear on, and see on TV, it's more paralyzing than I realize. But, you know, it's just snow. That's all.

Studs Terkel Have you sensed any difference in the behavior of people towards one another?

Man #1 I haven't been here long enough to tell, it's only been here about a couple of hours. So I really don't know.

Studs Terkel Your first impression is--

Man #1 That things in bad shape around here. [pause in recording]

Studs Terkel What are your first thoughts during this, you know. This event. Your first thoughts. What are your observations during this snow-in?

Minnesota Man Oh, not too much.

Studs Terkel Do you notice people behaving differently toward one another or the same way--

Minnesota Man [unintelligible].

Studs Terkel In what way

Minnesota Man Well, they're moving more clearly now. Yeah. And I'm from Minnesota myself, you know. St. Paul, you know. And we haven't got that much snow up here, you know. [pause

Studs Terkel During the snow-in, do you notice a difference during the snow-in?

Man #2 I notice.

Studs Terkel In what way?

Man #2 In what way? You want to know what way? I'm

Studs Terkel Okay. Your first reaction to the--Have you noticed a change in attitude [unintelligible]? [pause in recording] A lady behind a counter at a Loop hotel, perhaps her observations. What have you noticed during these last few day?

Woman #1 Everybody is jumpy, jumpy, jumpy. Outside of that, it's everybody says the weather is lousy.

Studs Terkel But they are jumpy.

Woman #1 But they're jumpy, but they're good-natured along with it. They're not panicked.

Studs Terkel Have you noticed--I'm sorry. Go ahead. That's okay, go right ahead. I'll ask your opinion in a moment. Have you noticed any basic difference in the attitude towards one another? People?

Woman #1 Oh, no. People are people the world over, they'll be people whether there's snow or whether there isn't, they'll still be people.

Studs Terkel What are your thoughts? I won't block you here. I'll get over here a second. I'll get my--these are thoughts, observations during these last two days, you know. What have you observed mostly? What hits you?

Woman #2 I really don't like it. Oh, you mean between people?

Studs Terkel Anything.

Woman #2 Nothing, particularly, it's just that the city seems so, you know, lost really. When you walk down the street, there is no one out, there's no cars, no buses, it's just--seems so desolate, you know.

Studs Terkel It's good or bad? The no cars, no buses outside.

Woman #2 Bad, really. It gives one a feeling of empty, you know, 'cause you're used to seeing a city so full of it, everything. You know, it's just to me, it's just empty. You know, it's just nothing.

Studs Terkel You noticed any difference in the attitudes of people towards

Woman #2 No, not particularly. You know, I mean, everybody's stuck, and what are you going to do about it? Not too much.

Studs Terkel You think friendlier or less or?

Woman #2 For the city, no, neither way. No more friendly or no less, actually. I can say, you know, it's the same.

Studs Terkel Thank you.

Woman #2

Studs Terkel Day night and this Friday evening. What comes to your mind? First thought. About the snow? Yeah. Actually, I just came into town. It, you know, it's, you know, it's what you read and hear on, and see on TV, it's more paralyzing than I realize. But, you know, it's just snow. That's all. Have you sensed any difference in the behavior of people towards one another? I haven't been here long enough to tell, it's only been here about a couple of hours. So I really don't know. Your first impression is-- That things in bad shape around here. [pause in recording] What are your first thoughts during this, you know. This event. Your first thoughts. What are your observations during this snow-in? Oh, not too much. Do you notice people behaving differently toward one another or the same way-- [unintelligible]. In what way do Well, they're moving more clearly now. Yeah. And I'm from Minnesota myself, you know. St. Paul, you know. And we haven't got that much snow up here, you know. [pause During the snow-in, do you notice a difference during the snow-in? I notice. In what way? In what way? You want to know what way? I'm freezing. Okay. Your first reaction to the--Have you noticed a change in attitude [unintelligible]? [pause in recording] A lady behind a counter at a Loop hotel, perhaps her observations. What have you noticed during these last few day? Everybody is jumpy, jumpy, jumpy. Outside of that, it's everybody says the weather is lousy. But they are jumpy. But they're jumpy, but they're good-natured along with it. They're not panicked. Have you noticed--I'm sorry. Go ahead. That's okay, go right ahead. I'll ask your opinion in a moment. Have you noticed any basic difference in the attitude towards one another? People? Oh, no. People are people the world over, they'll be people whether there's snow or whether there isn't, they'll still be people. What are your thoughts? I won't block you here. I'll get over here a second. I'll get my--these are thoughts, observations during these last two days, you know. What have you observed mostly? What hits you? I really don't like it. Oh, you mean between people? Anything. Nothing, particularly, it's just that the city seems so, you know, lost really. When you walk down the street, there is no one out, there's no cars, no buses, it's just--seems so desolate, you know. It's good or bad? The no cars, no buses outside. Bad, really. It gives one a feeling of empty, you know, 'cause you're used to seeing a city so full of it, everything. You know, it's just to me, it's just empty. You know, it's just nothing. You noticed any difference in the attitudes of people towards one No, not particularly. You know, I mean, everybody's stuck, and what are you going to do about it? Not too much. You think friendlier or less or? For the city, no, neither way. No more friendly or no less, actually. I can say, you know, it's the same. Thank you. Okay. Now

Woman #3 No,

Man #3 It won't open.

Woman #3 I can't get this damn lock.

Studs Terkel I'll wait.

Woman #3 [unintelligible].

Studs Terkel Yeah. What first came to mind when you knew it was this heavy, you know? When did you first notice it, it'd be a big

Woman #4 Well, I thought it was beautiful. Is. I like cold weather but not hot weather.

Studs Terkel What about the people? You notice a difference in attitude toward one another?

Woman #4 No, I think they are, the whole are very congenial and everything. Seem to be. I think my disposition has even improved a little bit today. And it's my second day on the job. New job.

Studs Terkel And your disposition improved because it's snowing.

Woman #4 Well, I don't know that it was snow or what it was.

Studs Terkel You feel pretty good.

Woman #4 I feel wonderful. [pause in recording]

Studs Terkel A veteran news vendor in the Loop, perhaps his observations. What first hit your mind during the, you know, starting last night, say?

News Vendor What hit my mind last?

Studs Terkel Yeah. With the snow and with what's happened here.

News Vendor Well, tell you the truth, I've seen plenty of it piled up. No transportation of no kind. And our deliveries slowed down. Of course. Nobody could--Loop hotels is all jammed capacity, no room to be gotten whatsoever. People that were working in the Loop or in the suburbs all stayed at the hotels downtown, there was no rooms available at no time.

Studs Terkel Have you noticed a difference in the attitude of people towards one another?

News Vendor Yes, I did. They're running around like a bunch of nuts, you know, and looking for taxicabs. Looking for other transportation, there's nothing to be gotten whatsoever. Hanging around the corners inside the drugstores, inside the buildings where the doors are open, but no results.

Studs Terkel If they seem friendly or less friendly

News Vendor They're less friendly, of course. Oh, yeah.

Studs Terkel Less friendly.

News Vendor Oh, yeah. They're pretty angry, yeah. At all times. And to my opinion, this was the worst one I ever witnessed myself.

Studs Terkel Okay, thank you.

News Vendor Thank you,

Studs Terkel One of the managers of a Loop drugstore. His thoughts. What are your first impressions?

Drugstore Manager My first impressions, chaos. Complete chaos. It's amazing. It's sort of different to see people walking down the street instead of seeing the automobiles. Other than that, I hope it's over very quickly.

Studs Terkel Did you feel good or bad about not seeing the automobiles?

Drugstore Manager Well, it was a relief in a way. More primitive, but a relief not to smell the automobile fumes and a little more quiet.

Studs Terkel What about attitudes of people towards one another?

Drugstore Manager They're more friendly. Not so nervous. An automobile honks, it was the only thing that seemed to disturb them.

Studs Terkel Marvelous. Thank you. [pause in recording] Forgive my cigar here. What were your first impressions during this, starting, say, with last night?

Man #4 I don't know.

Studs Terkel You know what we're talking about, it's the, that's okay, it's a little, even, don't worry about the language. What's your first impression during the big snow-in, have you noticed people behaving different towards one another?

Man #4 Oh, yes.

Studs Terkel In what way?

Man #4 This my first time to, in Chicago. I have three months and somebody, he send me this, for a long time, he's not--snow.

Studs Terkel I know it's not so in Puerto Rico, I know, but I mean, have you noticed with the snow, are people different, are they better, or worse?

Man #4 Oh, yes, very difference

Studs Terkel In what way?

Man #4 On the West Side, you know, in the--across the street, I see a lot of cars with a, many peoples have had problem with their cars. And I can't walk, this morning I can't walk because the snow is over, you know.

Studs Terkel Well, did you notice people, do they help each other or not? Are they more friendly or less friendly?

Man #4 Oh, I help some people, you know, because some people got a problem with the cars. And I have to push, you know, move out of the snow, you know. Mister. [pause

Studs Terkel Well, have you noticed, for example, any change in the behavior of people toward one another?

Woman #5 Never. I'd rather not.

Studs Terkel No, they're the same. Okay. [pause in recording] What was your first reaction when you knew it was going to be unprecedented, you know? Young policeman I'm talking to now.

Policeman What did I first think about? I thought, why did I ever leave my old job?

Studs Terkel Well, what was your involvement here? What was your work now during the emergency?

Policeman Just anything that comes along, I just listen to my radio.

Studs Terkel You drive a, but you're in a squad car.

Policeman Right.

Studs Terkel Well, what have you noticed about people? Have you noticed a difference in

Policeman Oh, they have their spirits up. It's not too bad. And they all laugh at the thing. So it's not too bad.

Studs Terkel You notice more what, more geniality?

Policeman More geniality, everybody's friendly. They give everybody a ride. So everybody's happy. They're not real happy, but it's not too bad.

Studs Terkel Well, what have you noticed about--How you feel about the absences of cars?

Policeman Oh, it's a little strange to be downtown and not have a big traffic jam. It feels like something out of a movie.

Studs Terkel Would you like to see it more often?

Policeman Oh, yes. Not the bad weather, just no traffic.

Studs Terkel Okay, anything else that comes to mind? Any experience you've had, any incident that comes to your mind?

Policeman No, nothing special.

Studs Terkel Thank you. [pause in recording] A lady working in a Loop drugstore. I just, have you noticed any change in the attitudes of people towards one another during this emergency?

Drugstore Clerk #1 Well, they're more friendly. They're very much friendly, they'll try to help you out. They ask a lot of questions, of course. Mostly about their buses. Everybody's helpful.

Studs Terkel How, what's your feeling about the absence of cars?

Drugstore Clerk #1 Well, it's quite a relief, really. I saw some of them stalled, parked way across the street. So people were trying to get across. Lots of people were walking in the streets. The few cars that were running, of course, would be honking, you know, to get us out of the way, but it's sort of a relief not to have all the heavy traffic.

Studs Terkel Thank you. [pause in recording] To a man who is working in one of the Loop drugstores. What is your first reaction during this snow?

Drugstore Clerk #2 How to get home. That's number one. And which way will I go.

Studs Terkel Have you noticed any difference in the behavior of people towards

Drugstore Clerk #2 Yeah. I noticed they more warm and more friendly towards people. They don't have, you don't meet a stranger now, everybody seem to know each other now. And everybody pulling together trying to find a way to go home. Everybody's conversation the same, how they going to get home. That's about it.

Studs Terkel You notice people pulling more together. No strangers, you

Drugstore Clerk #2 No, no strangers, just people. With the same problem. How to get home.

Studs Terkel Has the absence of the automobile affected you one way or--you know, the sight of no cars?

Drugstore Clerk #2 No, it has not. It hasn't affected me at all. It feels safer crossing the streets now. You can take your time and walk across now. [pause

Studs Terkel Ma'am, what's been your [pause in recording] What's been your observation, your key observation? During this time.

Man #5 Since [unintelligible] snow the other night? You mean this weather? Oh, I wouldn't [really?] express myself about this weather, because, [see, actually?] I been sitting up here since this morning, I've been sittin' around since 'bout eight o'clock, trying to move, but I can't get no place, you know.

Studs Terkel You're stuck in the Loop. Have you noticed the difference or a change in the attitudes of people towards one another?

Man #5 Oh, yeah, I think I [unintelligible].

Studs Terkel In what way?

Man #5 Some people look like they're mad at with one another because one of them get where they going quicker than what they can, something like that, you know, then I can take myself because then I feel the same sometimes. But any other opinion, I don't have any other opinion, you know. [unintelligible] But I'll be glad when I can get where I'm going, I know that much. [pause

Studs Terkel Your first reaction.

Teacher To the city?

Studs Terkel During the snow.

Teacher Yeah. That, you know, for a long time nothing in the world that would ever make them stop. And there's a kind of inevitability about it, that they just keep on going, and it doesn't matter about people, and it doesn't matter about anything. Now, it wasn't the person that made this stop, but I'm glad to see that it was stoppable. I'm just glad to see that life was stoppable. Life in the sort of commercial sense was stoppable. And it's amazing what this does to your values. That is to say, the way you rank different things as valuable. Because the--the things that, I'm a teacher and ordinarily I rank as quite highly valuable being prepared to do my classes and being, having everything, having lectures polished and all this sort of thing. And when this happened, I just put down the books, just absolutely putting them down, and other--people became fantastically more valuable. There's a girl that I would like to be with, but I can't for a number of complicated reasons, and it just would be--I know before the event, I know without even being with her that communication would be ten times easier, it'd just be ten times easier, because there's--nothing else is gumming up the works. And it's just very, very wonderful to be able to stop.

Studs Terkel As we're talking now on a Loop street, the sounds you hear in the background, the occasional autos indicate we're soon, we'll soon be going back to normalcy.

Teacher Yes, it'll all start up again. And I suppose that what one does with an experience like this is, in a certain sense just salted away, and it's kind of a measuring stick against which, that you use in your struggle against ordinary life.

Studs Terkel Have you sensed any differences

Teacher Yes. Yeah. I was--I wanted to walk up the Outer Drive, you know, just walk over there rather than drive up the damn thing. So I walked out, and I walked for, I don't know, four or five blocks, a long thing, a long stretch. I was walking back in and a cabbie came by and pulled up next to me and he said, "Come on, get in, I'll give you a free ride." And he said, he said to me, "What were you doing out there? Were you part of the work crew?" And I said "No," and I said, I told him that my car was stuck. The reason I told him my car was stuck is because ordinarily things like wanting to walk in the middle of the Outer Drive are things which I am ashamed ordinarily to admit to people, because they're by many standards kind of crazy things. So I didn't tell him that, I didn't admit to him what I was really doing. I told him my car was stuck, and he gave me a lift back into the Loop and said, "Well," I said, "Thank you very much for the ride," and he said, "Yes, everybody's got to have a soft corner now and then." Which was, which summed up the feeling. There's that and then there's the other thing. I went to a store this morning. And it was like the world was going to end. And people were just mobbed into the stores. As soon as they saw that the storm was not going to stop, this morning, they were, they just absolutely mobbed into the stores, and were very inhuman, as a matter of fact.

Studs Terkel They were inhuman.

Teacher Yeah. Yeah. And what I mean by that is that the only things for which they had any concern were filling their own needs. That was the only thing towards they had concerns. And the result of this was a kind of impatience, a kind of smoldering impatience about getting that loaf of bread or getting the last cellophane bag of wieners that was in the showcase, and--

Studs Terkel There's an interesting accompaniment to what you were just saying, the huge motors of the trucks going by.

Teacher Yeah, yeah, I didn't think of that. Yes. Yeah. I guess that's beginning again. [pause in recording]

Studs Terkel Officer, talking to a sergeant at the Greyhound bus station, what are your observations during this snow-in?

Police Sergeant I can't give you any comment on that.

Studs Terkel None at all?

Police Sergeant Whatsoever.

Studs Terkel Well, have you noticed people behaving differently than they would ordinarily?

Police Sergeant Very cooperative, that's all I can say.

Studs Terkel Okay, thank you. [pause in recording] What's your first impression?

Boy Well, I don't like it.

Studs Terkel Why don't you like it?

Boy Well, I never seen it before.

Studs Terkel Where are you from?

Boy Florida.

Studs Terkel What did you notice during the snow-in? Any first impression you have?

Woman #6 Everybody walking [around in? about?] the snow, trying to get home.

Studs Terkel Have you noticed a difference in the attitude toward one another?

Woman #6 Not too much, no.

Studs Terkel Pretty much the same as always?

Woman #6 Pretty much the same.

Studs Terkel Have you noticed any change in the attitude of

Man #6 No, just the snow is all, sir. Just the small changes in the snow.

Studs Terkel Just the snow?

Man #6 Yeah, snow is all.

Studs Terkel Well, have you, how have you felt about the absence of autos in the Loop during the--

Man #6 There ain't no absence, there's autos running all over there.

Studs Terkel I mean, you know, yesterday or last night.

Man #6 Yesterday or last night I wasn't here, I don't know anything about it, I wasn't, I wouldn't watch [the men? them, man?], I was gone.

Studs Terkel But you're a veteran of this area.

Man #6 Yeah, I was, I was down in Texas. I just got back.

Studs Terkel What's your, you have no one reaction to this.

Man #6 No, no.

Studs Terkel How about people? Are they behaving?

Man #6 Oh, they're real nice, the people are nice. Blowing their money and everything else. That's it, shut her off. [pause in recording]

Studs Terkel I know there's a Chicago veteran seated here at one of the restaurants in the Loop. What were your first observations during, since they, since last night?

Man #7 Well, I think people are, as a general rule, I think they're willing to help each other, probably a little more than usual. I've noticed the cars that are trying to get out, if somebody comes along they usually pitch in and push and help them get out. That's not always the case, but it certainly is now. That would be my--

Studs Terkel Well, this is obviously one of the heaviest we've had in years. Have you noticed, too, the reactions towards the less, less autos than usual because of the snow-in? What are your feelings about that?

Man #7 What do you mean

Studs Terkel Less, less vehicles, you know.

Man #7 Well, of course they couldn't come nor go, a lot of them are stuck.

Studs Terkel Does any particular incident occur to you, you remember sticks in your mind that you've noticed, one way or the other about people?

Man #7 No, nothing other than just that. I notice cars that are stuck, if a couple of sailors come along, they'll pitch in and push, they seem to have a lot of fun doing it. Others are of the same disposition. [pause in recording]

Studs Terkel Since last night, you know, with the snow and, what's the impression that you have about people?

Man #8 Well, the snow--The people? I don't observe people, I only look at people. That's right.

Studs Terkel You look at people.

Man #8 Everybody's an individual. Yes, sir.

Studs Terkel Well, have you noticed a, are they different, they--than a normal day during these past two days?

Man #8 Oh, not necessarily.

Studs Terkel You ever notice whether they're more or less friendly, say?

Man #8 I haven't, well, I haven't been talking to too many people the last couple of days, you know.

Studs Terkel Just watching.

Man #8 Well, I work every day. [pause in recording]

Studs Terkel What have your observations been? Speaking to one of the officers in town in the Loop through the past two days.

Policeman #2 It's been one of the worst I've ever seen. I've never seen this city tied up like this before.

Studs Terkel What about the people? Have you noticed a difference in their behavior toward one another?

Policeman #2 Well, everyone seems to be trying to help the other party. But on the West Side, they seem to be going in for looting. They're breaking into stores and everything else out there. [pause

Studs Terkel A fellow's eating a sandwich in the same restaurant. And what are your observations during the?

Moviegoer I've been in the movies all day. I couldn't tell you.

Studs Terkel You mean watching the movies, you mean?

Moviegoer Four different ones so far.

Studs Terkel You saw four different movies?

Moviegoer Yeah.

Studs Terkel Is this the way, what, just to kill the day?

Moviegoer Yeah, what else?

Studs Terkel Were you stuck in the Loop?

Moviegoer That's right.

Studs Terkel You noticed people behaving one way or the other differently?

Moviegoer There aren't so many down

Studs Terkel What movies d'you see?

Moviegoer "Fahrenheit". The one at the Woods. Was over to Chicago and the State-Lake, too.

Studs Terkel Well, you've been spending the snow-in for the past eight hours or so.

Moviegoer Yes, I

Studs Terkel How will you get home?

Moviegoer On the El.

Studs Terkel When there were fewer cars, that affect you one way or the other?

Moviegoer Well, mine is one of the cars it's fewer. [pause in recording]

Studs Terkel Sitting in a Loop, a very interesting cocktail lounge near the Loop, I'm talking to the man in charge, the bartender. The last two days have been very unusual. What's your first reaction to it?

Bartender First reaction, really? Well, the first reaction reminds you of when you were a kid. And the second, we should have it more often so we wouldn't complain so much about really bad weather if it isn't really bad.

Studs Terkel This is an interesting, you said it reminded you of when you were a kid. Would you mind just explaining that just a little?

Bartender Well, I lived on a farm with my grandmother. And I can remember the lane was usually always snowed in about six foot high, and we walked along the ridge of it, deep--up to our knees in it, and it just looked, you know, a lot of it looked the same way today, that's all.

Studs Terkel Do you feel too, that people have been behaving different toward one another during these past two days?

Bartender Have they what?

Studs Terkel Been behaving differently toward one another during these past two days?

Bartender Yeah, I could see a little bit of dissension amongst people.

Studs Terkel Dissension?

Bartender It's, I don't know how to say it, they're just not themselves as much as they usually are, they get aggravated a little bit easier.

Studs Terkel You seen them helping each other, too, or?

Bartender Oh yes, yes, I've seen quite a few helping each other getting their cars out on Foster Avenue and all those places. Saw one fella out there trying to dig his car out with a board today. Some other fella knocks at the window, motions over the window and shoves a shovel out to him.

Studs Terkel So you saw it working both ways.

Bartender Oh, sure. It works both ways.

Studs Terkel What were you saying about walking to school?

Bartender We used to have to walk from the country into school into town. It was about three miles. So with all this snow, this reminded me of the same thing, instead of walking out the lane which was filled from side to side with snow, you had to walk on the ridge on top of it along the fencepost 'til you got down to the main road.

Studs Terkel So you found this last two days, would you say more pleasant or unpleasant, generally, all around?

Bartender Well, me working on the inside, I couldn't say that I was out there long enough for it to really be unpleasant. A little tiresome walking about three blocks waist-deep in snow, but outside of that, it wasn't bad. [pause in recording]

Studs Terkel A man hurrying along the Loop, I stopped him for a moment. Your impressions during the last two days.

Man #9 Well, it, the way I see it, that we were pretty lucky so far, you know. Getting it on the West Coast and getting into Mexico and East Coast, and sooner or later had to happen. And so far we've been pretty lucky, but this time it hit. And when it hit, it really hit, so.

Studs Terkel Have you noticed any difference in the way people act towards one another?

Man #9 Oh yeah, yeah, you see a, you know, a lot of people around here, they figure, "Well, it couldn't happen to us," but it did, see. And everybody's cold, miserable and well, I don't know how to put it, but that's the way everything is.

Studs Terkel Are they, you find people what, less friendly or more or what?

Man #9 Well, in one way, I guess it gets a little closer together, you know, it's a, could get a little warm, I'll put it that way, you know. But outside of that, it's a, they're a little more, well, I wouldn't know how to say it, but you get them close together to stay warm. But if you're walking across the street, everybody's pushing away, you know, just to get where they want to go, and let it go at that, that's all. It's--see, it's not like New York. I come from New York, and it's kind of, what do you call it, it's kind of funny.

Studs Terkel In what way?

Man #9 Well, Chicago has been a great town. You know, since I've lived here, and everybody wants to go in a hurry here, see. Like in New York [unintelligible], you can always duck in the subway. Or you can do other things. Well, here, we've got to walk. You know, yak, yak, yak, and everybody say, "Well, get out of my way, I'll talk to you later. I want to get out of the cold." That's all. But I think as far as these guys here, the Sanitation Department is doing a terrific job. They really are. But the only place down here on Clark and Grand where I live at the St. Regis Hotel, you can't even get across the street. But down here they like, VIP or something, you know, or was coming to town or something, you know, Mayor Daley. Yeah. I shouldn't have said that. [pause in recording]

Studs Terkel Back at my building now after covering the Loop a bit, and one of the watchmen here, the last two days. What have you noticed most in the past two days, the snow-in?

Watchman What I know, what do you mean?

Studs Terkel Yeah.

Watchman What do I notice most?

Studs Terkel Yeah. Well, for example, the people; they act different than they usually do?

Watchman I don't know, I don't think so.

Studs Terkel Just the same? They act no differently than before? What have you noticed?

Watchman I think everybody and everyone is, more or less, they cooperate in this weather. At least the neighborhoods. Every--all the neighbors and all the kids, they [always?] clean up the place. And also the surface lines, everyone is more or less cooperative. But this is a good thing to keep in mind is, is in case it happens again to be alert, to be prepared. We were caught short-handed.

Studs Terkel But you notice that people are more cooperative,

Watchman I think so. In emergency they are. But other than that, everybody's cutting each other's throat, but when it comes down to something like this, they're more or less cooperative.

Ms. Rosenberg [content removed, see catalog record] I got time for one more verse. [content removed, see catalog record]

Studs Terkel So this word of universal advice, though. I wonder what Mrs. Charlie Chaplin or Mrs. Pablo Casals would think about this. We do know what Picasso thought of--

Ms. Rosenberg I'm thinking of [dull?], young men.

Studs Terkel Of course. [Pashia?] Rosenberg, thank you very much for a very delightful hour.

Ms. Rosenberg And thank you very much, Mr. Terkel. The feeling was entirely mutual.