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Guy Duckworth and three students discuss teaching and learning piano, part 2

BROADCAST: 1968 | DURATION: 00:28:41

Synopsis

Musician, pianist, and educator Guy Duckworth and three of his young students at Northwestern--Darrah Cloud, David Greenberg, and Scott MacMillan--discuss teaching and learning piano. Part 2 of 2.

Transcript

Tap within the transcript to jump to that part of the audio.

OK

David Greenberg Stand up here to--

Guy Duckworth Okay.

Studs Terkel This discussion is between David and Darrah and Scott and Dr. Guy Duckworth here, for those who may have tuned in late, Room 108 of Lufkin Hall at the school of music of Northwestern University, and Guy Duckworth is, this is just three of his students who are now 11, beginning their fourth year and generally your students about begin, of the young people in your preparatory music of piano classes, generally come in about eight?

Guy Duckworth Yes. Fewer seven-year-olds and even fewer six-year-olds. But the majority seem to be eight.

Studs Terkel And here we are with David, with Scott, and with Dara, and we've been hearing some Bach and different interpretations of it, and talk of legato and dynamics and, where are we now, Dr. Duckworth?

Guy Duckworth Well, we thought we would move on to "America" here and to show how we, well, we began playing by ear, didn't we, class, and we want to try to continue playing by ear. Let's just for a moment sing "America". And we'll do it right here, and you're going to space in the air, go. [Sings with all children]. What happens here? [Continues with children]. All right. And, so, we would go to the piano and see if this was true.

Studs Terkel I just about to ask one question, since this is audio and not visual, our three companions here, Guy, were doing something as you're singing "America" and step, step, you did it with your hands. What were you doing? Your hands were being raised and lowered, all three of you. What were you doing, Darrah?

Darrah Cloud Well, we were showing like, our hands are through the air as music and we were showing-- And we were showing what the music, like the piano, what would it be. Like, I mean, the steps and that's just going to another key, and these would just be little movements and then a skip would be kind of a big movement. A large movement going up or down according to how the air was music. So, the air being music, then, you see these notes and jumps as physical steps, don't you? You see them as going up and down, is that the idea? And, so, you were doing that to "America". So then we go to the piano and see what we did here in the air was correct. And of course, we have done that. The next thing that we want to do is to find out what kind of chords would fit with this. Darrah, would you just play, or David, you have a piano by yourself here, play it in the key of F, "America", but with very simple chords, just with the one chord, and the four chord, and the five seven. Like we did a long time ago? So we just have a bare skeleton, a harmonic skeleton of "America". [plays piano] And, so, take that register and show what we've done with it to provide variety, what else do other chords? We use the two and the six chord. What do they do for the music? Well, they just sort of fill in between the-- Yeah, the empty spaces. And keep-- Because the one chord gets a little monotonous. Gives variety, then. That is monotonous sounding. Okay, show how that works. Darrah. [plays piano] Okay, you go on, David, with the skeleton. [plays piano] And Darrah, you show how you provide variety with other chords. [plays piano] Fine, and it does seem to do that for us. And what chords are we using now? Our harmonic vocabulary has gotten quite large, I think. [children call out numbers of chords] Show these chords in a sequence, Scott, and keep the key of F. Let him have a piano and play the sequence one to six to four to two. Should I play that three chord or should I play that seven chord? Whatever you like. Whatever you like. And what's the key signature of the, of the key of F, Scott? Oh, one flat, B flat. B flat. Call the chords, call the chords as you play. [plays piano and calls out chord numbers] F major to D minor to B flat major to G minor to C major to A minor to F major. F major. And you play it, Darrah, now, and give the number of the chord. You said we were playing one chords and two chords and what have you, and you tell us the number now. [plays piano] [unintelligible]. Now, I think that there might be some questions about this. Ask us something, Studs. What in the world is all this? Well, I was, I was listening, of course. I'm very much, very much impressed. I guess that, how you do is you relate--here's a song, "America", that all of us have sung in school and sing, but you take it apart, but in taking it apart you seem to know it even more than when we used to just sing it in school as something vague now. I don't know if I'm putting my words properly or not. I'm very much impressed. You mean, how we do it in the order that it was-- Yeah. Just the way you did up there, the way you call the shots, the way you called the shots, I think. Yes. They're--have a--getting back to this gestalt thing. Yeah. They have a melodic understanding, they have a harmonic understanding. We didn't go through the rhythmic area, we might just do this for moment now even though we don't have a visual, but you'll hear our clapping and our walking the beat. Let's do this. For "America", let's just move this back a bit here. Okay. And sit up. And let's just clap and sing. [claps and sings with children] So our feet are moving to the beat and our hands are clapping. So, there's our rhythm. As you are doing that, and your feet were moving, you were swaying getting the rhythm of it, earlier you, when Dr. Duckworth said something to me about gestalt, did you dig what he was putting down? I say this, no, we were talking earlier about something, well, it's basically what you were saying, Darrah, about there's music in the air, I mean, that is, he was telling me this privately, that he teaches music to you guys as though it's overall life, it's not just one note, but song and your body's involved and your thoughts are involved, your imagination's involved, and, so, it's the overall design. Gestalt is the word that puts everything together. Yeah! You got it! Perfect. It couldn't be explained better. Thank you, David. Now, our variations after "America" might be appropriate after we've shown our melody, how we've worked out the melody, how we worked out the harmony, work out the rhythm. Now, if we really want to know what Bach has said in his "C Minor Prelude" or what Tchaikovsky has said in his "Morning Prayer" or Clementi in his third movement of the "C Major Sonatina", why it seems most appropriate to us to use those tools or those ideas with something that's more familiar and change it and see what we can do with it. So it's what you're going to do with "America" after Bach now, Darrah. Now, what are the clues here, what's Bach's vocabulary? Talk about it with the class. Well, you've got the sixteenth note, you've got-- Okay. Going with the eighth note. All right. Sixteenth notes are in which hand? In the right hand. The right hand. And the quarter notes. And the sixths. And the two eighths. And the two eighths there. All right. And anything else? The sixteenth notes, do they move in steps or skips? Skips. Both. Thirds. Fourths. Yes, all of them are thirds. Are skips. Thirds are steps. See, look at the third measure here, Scott. Oh, I guess it does move in fourths. Fourths and thirds then, here's a fifth. Yeah, there's a fifth. And if it moves and skips, what are you going to suspect, then? What's being outlined? Where are you going to find the melody? You're going to have to stretch your hand, though, and not. Those are possibilities, but if you outline, you have a skip from C to E flat to G, what does that outline? It's C minor, isn't it? And if it moves by a fourth to a third, what does it outline? Four chord. So it's outlining chords all the time if it moves via skips, doesn't it? If it moves by steps, it couldn't. But if it moves by skips you've got to suspect that they're going to move by--all right. So we have our chords for "America" established. So we have a pretty good idea of what Bach might have done "America" after his own prelude. Let's hear a little bit of what you've done, Darrah. Doing it in the key of C. [plays piano] So, she's outlined it for the right hand. She's got a little thing going the left hand and extended the melody. What kind of rhythm is the melody? Now, we just did quarter, quarter, quarter, quarter, now what do you have in your melody? Play it again, let's count as she plays. [plays piano] Okay, we want to start again. Okay, do it again. [plays piano] [unintelligible] We want to find out what kinds of notes. Go ahead. And. [plays piano] Sing the notes she's playing. Sing it. Sing it louder. Okay. Fine. So we changed the rhythm that was originally mostly quarter-notes into half-notes to accomplish all this filigree. Nice. Nice. Thank you, Darrah. That was "America" according to Bach. A time in Leipzig long before America. Let's try a little bit of Clementi with "America", David. Now talk a little bit about Clementi's vocabulary and his ideas. Well, his--on the left hand, the broken-up chords so they're somewhat like Darrah's Bach in the right hand, only it's on the left hand. In the left hand, now, all right. And then there might be two or three little [frillicks?] in the right hand. Little [fritticks?]? Okay. [Frillicks?]. All right. All right. So That you're going to avoid the melody sometime, or embellish it. Change it around. What key are you going to play it? I'm going to play in C. All right. No, wait, no, I think I was going to do it in F because of the-- Because we played it in F? Yeah. All right. [plays piano] And you put on a Clementi ending. All right. That goes quite well for you. So we have what? We have the Bach, we have a romantic. And then more of a classic feeling with the, with the Clementi, and he had lots of things to think about there, he was working with all the chords that we showed you earlier. And in the different inversions. In the different inversions, and he dared to, since we have a triad with most of our chords, there are three possible positions for it. So he dared to change positions of all of his chords in his left hand, and he got quite complicated and intricate. How many levels were you thinking of, David, this is, now that Dr. Duckworth has mentioned this, there are about three or four different challenges involved all at one time, weren't they? Yes, indeed, and they occurred simultaneously. You mean, the different positions of the chords. Yes, that would be one. What else were you thinking about? The--well, I don't think--you know, I played one-- You might help out, Scott. Trill and then-- What else would you be thinking about as you improvise? The melody. The melody. The melody and-- The broken chords. The broken chords. Okay, we did that, we did that. And kind of thinking of the composer and, or the piece that you're playing. That had to be in mind all the time, that feeling, the Clementi. And then, of course, the end. The ending there, the rhythm of the melody. So about four or five different aspects in your mind at the same time as you were improvising. He had to think in the key of F, he had some difficulty remembering B flat, and that is important to keep in mind. All right, Scott, let's hear what you've done after Tchaikovsky now. Now we come to the romantic. Yes, now we have the romantic. Scott, the romantic. Do We have any music here? The shifting of the pianos. And in the meantime, the two colleagues of Scott, Darrah and David, I suppose, will be sort of playing in the air. Yes, listening very carefully to-- Oh, they'd be the critics, too. Yes. Oh, I said, "David, will you and Darrah offer your critique of what Scott is doing?" This is a very important part of our class, is this building of a listening procedure. Listening. Now, talk about Tchaikovsky, Scott. Well, mainly, you've got two notes in the left hand, and two notes in the right hand, and it's really chords and melody. So, show us how we have harmonized "America", show Mr. Terkel. You mean, just the way we always do? Yes. [plays piano] So, we have three notes, go ahead, three notes in the left hand, one in the right, it's easier to see the chord this way and now he's going to play it after Tchaikovsky, and he's going to put two notes in the right hand, two in the left, it's more difficult to see now. Okay. Thank you. And, so, splitting up the chord in that way we call "four-part chorale writing," really is getting to the point of freshman theory in college, where they can see chords split between two voices, and write the Bach chorale kind of work. By the way, as you're saying this, Dr. Duckworth, it's interesting, the level on which our 11-year-old friends here are approaching music would be equivalent in this within, without, you know, drawing diagrams, equivalent to that would be freshmen in college music. We're approaching this work right now, yes. Well, what-- How do you feel about it? Do you feel it's too difficult for you? Do you like it? I think this is a challenge. Yeah, it is. It's a challenge against older kids that are playing different things than us, maybe even lower things than us. It's a lot different than these other piano teachers. I mean, they teach you how to learn a song, and then when you, and then when you quit piano or something, you don't, you don't know how to, even start a song. I mean, that's the thing about your theory is, I mean, the steps, skips, and repeats, we know how to learn how to play a song, and then my mother, she can't, she can hardly transpose, it's real hard, but that's the thing about, she knows steps, skips and repeats, [unintelligible]. That's your mother. Well, the way I'd compare it, would be, my hobby is horseback riding, and we had a horse at the stable-- She's a good rider, she's received prizes, too. There's horse at the stable named Liberty, and many people were scared to ride him, because he was a very hard horse to ride, and the idea of this, of the owner of the stable, to give them this horse, was to be a challenge, to see if they can control him, and it's the same thing with a piece. See if you can control a piece, and it's a challenge to see if you can do this. We feel very strongly here, Studs, that if there has to be a sacrifice between product and process of learning, we're going to sacrifice product. We're going to be sure that these kids know how to learn, and this we know they'll keep with them, whereas sometimes just to memorize a piece is not retained. So it comes to the question of process, this word of your knowing what you're learning and you're listening, now, David, you and Darrah, our equestrian as well as seer of storms, you know, were listening to Scott, and do you have comments, as you were hearing Scott, you know, meld Tchaikovsky to, weld Tchaikovsky to "America", you saw the challenge he was facing, weren't you? Have you tried it this way, have you tried to work out the Tchaikovsky with "America", David? Not, no, I haven't. Have you tried it, Darrah, to know what problems you might be drawing up against? Well, I've gotten too [vigorous?], but I really haven't-- Well, this might be a very good project for us, is to see that the, each one of us, first, so Scott would play after Clementi now and after Bach where David would share Darrah's and Scott's performances, were not, so we'll know more of what the other guy's up against, and then our listening is going to be all the better. I remember we began, the program opened, you were sort of improvising, fooling around, or as jazzmen would say, "noodling Bartok." All right. Scott, now we've not done this, this is going to be right off the cuff for you, off the cuff. So this will be experimental? Right. Okay. Now, Bartok, what was his [unintelligible] that we played when we started the program? The [unintelligible]. Fifths, on fifths, and what scale are we working in? Do you--do you know this? For Bartok. D minor diminished? Okay, here is D minor. [plays piano] Now, what scale do we use? But centered around D, though. We ended on D, started--let's see. You play the melody a bit, David, and find out your scale. This may have been a [unintelligible] to do this because this is out of the blue. Not at all, this is very good, this is proof of something here. Okay, you played the complete scale from D to D. Spell it, class. It's D, E, F, G, A, B, C, and D. All right. What would minor be if it were on D, Darrah? If the B flat would be minor, what would it be major? The key? Major would be [plays piano]. Okay, and how many sharps then for D? Two. Okay. So This is not major or minor, this is Dorian. Dorian? Dorian. The Dorian scale. All right. Now. What would it be on--well, let's play "America" in D, Dorian. Darrah, you start it. Just play the tune. [plays piano] Okay. [Unintelligible] David. [plays piano] Okay, and now we have kind of an ancient or antique sound for "America", now Scott, you put fifths to this, and start an accompaniment, both hands, give us an introduction. Just put chords in the third note? Then I guess we should talk more about Bartok here. What--how did Bartok do his accompaniment? Fifths, up and down, does he go outside the Dorian scale? What happens when he does go outside of the Dorian scale? I mean, when he goes out, does he do anything with his touch? What are these marks right here? Accents. When he goes out. He accents when he goes out. So you have the privilege to go outside the Dorian scale and we're going to play the tune. All right? Let's try it. Have to play anything? See, let's see what happens. Okay. Give us an introduction. The same thing? Play anything you want, just give us an introduction. [plays piano] Ready? And. [plays piano] Thank you very much. I was thinking about this whole hour and I have learned a great deal, too. I suppose the question to ask Dr. Duckworth, how, here are three of your prized students, yet, I know many of your students have this approach. How do they enter the school? What makes them eligible? We have auditions each quarter, and the auditions for winter quarter are after December 1. If anyone interested would please call my studio, would my telephone number be appropriate? Sure. Four-nine-two, five-four-four-two, after December 1, then an audition will be arranged, and we hear everyone. Well, quite obviously, as Darrah would say, and [at the college?] say, "Music is in the air," with the approach of Guy Duckworth in teaching piano, and as--obviously, it's more than teaching piano, it's teaching a certain aspect of music and connection with life and freedom, that where you people see it? What do we say, let's bang away at the piano as a sort of summing up. Okay. Let's play Bartok. [pianos playing]

Studs Terkel

Darrah Cloud And we were showing what the music, like the piano, what would it be. Like, I mean, the steps and that's just going to another key, and these would just be little movements and then a skip would be kind of a big movement.

Guy Duckworth A large movement going up or down according to how the air was music.

Studs Terkel So, the air being music, then, you see these notes and jumps as physical steps, don't you? You see them as going up and down, is that the idea? And, so, you were doing that to "America".

Guy Duckworth So then we go to the piano and see what we did here in the air was correct. And of course, we have done that. The next thing that we want to do is to find out what kind of chords would fit with this. Darrah, would you just play, or David, you have a piano by yourself here, play it in the key of F, "America", but with very simple chords, just with the one chord, and the four chord, and the five seven.

David Greenberg Like we did a long time ago?

Guy Duckworth So we just have a bare skeleton, a harmonic skeleton of "America".

David Greenberg [plays piano]

Guy Duckworth And, so, take that register and show what we've done with it to provide variety, what else do other chords?

Scott MacMillan We use the two and the six chord.

Guy Duckworth What do they do for the music?

Scott MacMillan Well, they

Darrah Cloud

David Greenberg just sort of fill in between the-- Yeah, the empty spaces. And keep-- Because the one chord gets a little monotonous.

Guy Duckworth Gives variety, then. That is monotonous sounding. Okay, show how that works. Darrah.

Darrah Cloud [plays piano]

Guy Duckworth Okay, you go on, David, with the

David Greenberg skeleton. [plays piano]

Guy Duckworth And Darrah, you show how you provide variety with other chords.

Darrah Cloud

Guy Duckworth [plays piano] Fine, and it does seem to do that for us. And what chords are we using now? Our harmonic vocabulary has gotten quite large, I think. [children call out numbers of chords] Show these chords in a sequence, Scott, and keep the key of F. Let him have a piano and play the sequence one to six to four to two.

Scott MacMillan Should I play that three chord or should I play that seven chord? Oh, one flat, B flat. B

Guy Duckworth

Scott MacMillan Oh, one flat, B flat.

Guy Duckworth Whatever you like. Whatever you like. And what's the key signature of the, of the key of F, Scott? B flat. Call the chords, call

Scott MacMillan

Guy Duckworth the chords as you play. [plays piano and calls out chord numbers] F major to D minor to B flat major to G minor to C major to A minor to F major. F major. And you play it, Darrah, now, and give the number of the chord. You said we were playing one chords and two chords and what have you, and you tell us the number now.

Darrah Cloud [plays piano] [unintelligible].

Guy Duckworth Now, I think that there might be some questions about this. Ask us something, Studs. What in the world is all this?

Studs Terkel Well, I was, I was listening, of course. I'm very much, very much impressed. I guess that, how you do is you relate--here's a song, "America", that all of us have sung in school and sing, but you take it apart, but in taking it apart you seem to know it even more than when we used to just sing it in school as something vague now. I don't know if I'm putting my words properly or not. I'm very much impressed.

Scott MacMillan You mean, how we do it in the order that it was--

Studs Terkel Yeah. Just the way you did up there, the way you call the shots, the way you called the shots, I think.

Guy Duckworth Yes. They're--have a--getting back to this gestalt thing.

Studs Terkel Yeah.

Guy Duckworth They have a melodic understanding, they have a harmonic understanding. We didn't go through the rhythmic area, we might just do this for moment now even though we don't have a visual, but you'll hear our clapping and our walking the beat. Let's do this. For "America", let's just move this back a bit here. Okay. And sit up. And let's just clap and sing. [claps and sings with children] So our feet are moving to the beat and our hands are clapping. So, there's our rhythm. Gestalt is the word that puts everything together. Yeah! You got it! Perfect. It couldn't be explained better. Thank you, David. Now, our variations after "America" might be appropriate after we've shown our melody, how we've worked out the melody, how we worked out the harmony, work out the rhythm. Now, if we really want to know what Bach has said in his "C Minor Prelude" or what Tchaikovsky has said in his "Morning Prayer" or Clementi in his third movement of the "C Major Sonatina", why it seems most appropriate to us to use those tools or those ideas with something that's more familiar and change it and see what we can do with it. So it's what you're going to do with "America" after Bach now, Darrah. Now, what are the clues here, what's Bach's vocabulary? Talk about it with the class. Well, you've got the sixteenth note, you've got-- Okay. Going with the eighth note. All right. Sixteenth notes are in which hand? In the right hand. The right hand. And the quarter notes. And the sixths. And the two eighths. And the two eighths there. All right. And anything else? The sixteenth notes, do they move in steps or skips? Skips. Both. Thirds. Fourths. Yes, all of them are thirds. Are skips. Thirds are steps. See, look at the third measure here, Scott. Oh, I guess it does move in fourths. Fourths and thirds then, here's a fifth. Yeah, there's a fifth. And if it moves and skips, what are you going to suspect, then? What's being outlined? Where are you going to find the melody? You're going to have to stretch your hand, though, and not. Those are possibilities, but if you outline, you have a skip from C to E flat to G, what does that outline? It's C minor, isn't it? And if it moves by a fourth to a third, what does it outline? Four chord. So it's outlining chords all the time if it moves via skips, doesn't it? If it moves by steps, it couldn't. But if it moves by skips you've got to suspect that they're going to move by--all right. So we have our chords for "America" established. So we have a pretty good idea of what Bach might have done "America" after his own prelude. Let's hear a little bit of what you've done, Darrah. Doing it in the key of C. [plays piano] So, she's outlined it for the right hand. She's got a little thing going the left hand and extended the melody. What kind of rhythm is the melody? Now, we just did quarter, quarter, quarter, quarter, now what do you have in your melody? Play it again, let's count as she plays. [plays piano] Okay, we want to start again. Okay, do it again. [plays piano] [unintelligible] We want to find out what kinds of notes. Go ahead. And. [plays piano] Sing the notes she's playing. Sing it. Sing it louder. Okay. Fine. So we changed the rhythm that was originally mostly quarter-notes into half-notes to accomplish all this filigree. Nice. Nice. Thank you, Darrah. That was "America" according to Bach. A time in Leipzig long before America. Let's try a little bit of Clementi with "America", David. Now talk a little bit about Clementi's vocabulary and his ideas. Well, his--on the left hand, the broken-up chords so they're somewhat like Darrah's Bach in the right hand, only it's on the left hand. In the left hand, now, all right. And then there might be two or three little [frillicks?] in the right hand. Little [fritticks?]? Okay. [Frillicks?]. All right. All right. So That you're going to avoid the melody sometime, or embellish it. Change it around. What key are you going to play it? I'm going to play in C. All right. No, wait, no, I think I was going to do it in F because of the-- Because we played it in F? Yeah. All right. [plays piano] And you put on a Clementi ending. All right. That goes quite well for you. So we have what? We have the Bach, we have a romantic. And then more of a classic feeling with the, with the Clementi, and he had lots of things to think about there, he was working with all the chords that we showed you earlier. And in the different inversions. In the different inversions, and he dared to, since we have a triad with most of our chords, there are three possible positions for it. So he dared to change positions of all of his chords in his left hand, and he got quite complicated and intricate. How many levels were you thinking of, David, this is, now that Dr. Duckworth has mentioned this, there are about three or four different challenges involved all at one time, weren't they? Yes, indeed, and they occurred simultaneously. You mean, the different positions of the chords. Yes, that would be one. What else were you thinking about? The--well, I don't think--you know, I played one-- You might help out, Scott. Trill and then-- What else would you be thinking about as you improvise? The melody. The melody. The melody and-- The broken chords. The broken chords. Okay, we did that, we did that. And kind of thinking of the composer and, or the piece that you're playing. That had to be in mind all the time, that feeling, the Clementi. And then, of course, the end. The ending there, the rhythm of the melody. So about four or five different aspects in your mind at the same time as you were improvising. He had to think in the key of F, he had some difficulty remembering B flat, and that is important to keep in mind. All right, Scott, let's hear what you've done after Tchaikovsky now. Now we come to the romantic. Yes, now we have the romantic. Scott, the romantic. Do We have any music here? The shifting of the pianos. And in the meantime, the two colleagues of Scott, Darrah and David, I suppose, will be sort of playing in the air. Yes, listening very carefully to-- Oh, they'd be the critics, too. Yes. Oh, I said, "David, will you and Darrah offer your critique of what Scott is doing?" This is a very important part of our class, is this building of a listening procedure. Listening. Now, talk about Tchaikovsky, Scott. Well, mainly, you've got two notes in the left hand, and two notes in the right hand, and it's really chords and melody. So, show us how we have harmonized "America", show Mr. Terkel. You mean, just the way we always do? Yes. [plays piano] So, we have three notes, go ahead, three notes in the left hand, one in the right, it's easier to see the chord this way and now he's going to play it after Tchaikovsky, and he's going to put two notes in the right hand, two in the left, it's more difficult to see now. Okay. Thank you. And, so, splitting up the chord in that way we call "four-part chorale writing," really is getting to the point of freshman theory in college, where they can see chords split between two voices, and write the Bach chorale kind of work. By the way, as you're saying this, Dr. Duckworth, it's interesting, the level on which our 11-year-old friends here are approaching music would be equivalent in this within, without, you know, drawing diagrams, equivalent to that would be freshmen in college music. We're approaching this work right now, yes. Well, what-- How do you feel about it? Do you feel it's too difficult for you? Do you like it? Yeah, it is. It's a challenge against older kids that are playing different things than us, maybe even lower things than us. It's a lot different than these other piano teachers. I mean, they teach you how to learn a song, and then when you, and then when you quit piano or something, you don't, you don't know how to, even start a song. I mean, that's the thing about your theory is, I mean, the steps, skips, and repeats, we know how to learn how to play a song, and then my mother, she can't, she can hardly transpose, it's real hard, but that's the thing about, she knows steps, skips and repeats, [unintelligible]. That's your mother. Well, the way I'd compare it, would be, my hobby is horseback riding, and we had a horse at the stable--

Studs Terkel

David Greenberg Gestalt is the word that puts everything together.

Studs Terkel Yeah! You got it!

Guy Duckworth Perfect. It couldn't be explained

Darrah Cloud

Guy Duckworth better. Thank you, David. Now, our variations after "America" might be appropriate after we've shown our melody, how we've worked out the melody, how we worked out the harmony, work out the rhythm. Now, if we really want to know what Bach has said in his "C Minor Prelude" or what Tchaikovsky has said in his "Morning Prayer" or Clementi in his third movement of the "C Major Sonatina", why it seems most appropriate to us to use those tools or those ideas with something that's more familiar and change it and see what we can do with it. So it's what you're going to do with "America" after Bach now, Darrah. Now, what are the clues here, what's Bach's vocabulary? Talk about it with

Darrah Cloud the class. Well, you've got the sixteenth note, you've

Guy Duckworth

Darrah Cloud

Guy Duckworth

Darrah Cloud

Guy Duckworth

Darrah Cloud got-- Okay. Going with the eighth note. All right. Sixteenth notes are in which hand? In the right hand. The right hand. And the quarter notes. And the sixths. And the two eighths.

Guy Duckworth And the two eighths there. All right. And anything else? The sixteenth notes, do they move in steps or skips?

David Greenberg Skips. Both.

Guy Duckworth Thirds. Fourths.

David Greenberg Yes, all of

Scott MacMillan them are thirds. Are skips. Thirds are steps.

Guy Duckworth See, look at the third measure here, Scott.

Scott MacMillan

David Greenberg

Guy Duckworth Oh, I guess it does move in fourths. Fourths and thirds then, here's a fifth. Yeah, there's a fifth. And if it moves and skips, what are you going to suspect, then? What's being outlined? You're going to have to stretch your hand, though, and not. Those are possibilities, but if you outline, you have a skip from C to E flat to G,

Darrah Cloud

David Greenberg You're going to have to stretch

Guy Duckworth Where are you going to find the melody? your hand, though, and not. Those are possibilities, but if you outline, you have a skip from C to E flat to G, what does that outline? It's C minor, isn't it? And if it moves by a fourth to a third, what does it outline?

Darrah Cloud Four chord.

Guy Duckworth So it's outlining chords all the time if it moves via skips, doesn't it? If it moves by steps, it couldn't. But if it moves by skips you've got to suspect that they're going to move by--all right. So we have our chords for "America" established. So we have a pretty good idea of what Bach might have done "America" after his own prelude. Let's hear a little bit of what you've done, Darrah. Doing it in the key of C.

Darrah Cloud [plays piano]

Guy Duckworth So, she's outlined it for the right hand. She's got a little thing going the left hand and extended the melody. What kind of rhythm is the melody? Now, we just did quarter, quarter, quarter, quarter, now what do you have in your melody? Play it again, let's count as she plays.

Darrah Cloud [plays piano]

Guy Duckworth Okay, we want to start again. Okay, do it again.

Darrah Cloud [plays piano]

Guy Duckworth [unintelligible] We want to find out what

Darrah Cloud kinds of notes. Go ahead. And. [plays piano]

Guy Duckworth Sing the notes she's playing. Sing it. Sing it louder. Okay. Fine. So we changed the rhythm that was originally mostly quarter-notes into half-notes to accomplish all this filigree. Nice. Nice.

Studs Terkel Thank you, Darrah. That was "America" according to Bach. A time in Leipzig long before America.

Guy Duckworth Let's try a little bit of Clementi with "America", David. Now talk a little bit about Clementi's vocabulary and his ideas.

David Greenberg Well, his--on

Guy Duckworth the left hand, the broken-up chords so they're somewhat like Darrah's Bach in the right hand, only it's on the left hand. In the left hand, now, all right.

David Greenberg And then there might be two or three little [frillicks?] in

Guy Duckworth

Studs Terkel

Guy Duckworth the right hand. Little [fritticks?]? Okay. [Frillicks?]. All right. All right. So That you're going to avoid the melody sometime, or embellish it. Change it around. What key are you going to play it?

David Greenberg I'm going to

Guy Duckworth play in C. All right.

David Greenberg No, wait, no, I think I was going to do it in F because of the--

Guy Duckworth Because we played it in F? All right.

David Greenberg

Guy Duckworth Yeah. All right.

David Greenberg [plays piano] So we have what? We have the Bach, we have a romantic. And then more of a classic feeling with the, with the Clementi, and he had lots of things to think about there, he was working with all the chords that we showed you earlier. And in the different inversions. In the different inversions, and he dared to, since we have a triad with most of our chords, there are three possible positions for it.

Guy Duckworth

Studs Terkel So we have what? We have

Guy Duckworth the Bach, we have a romantic. And then more of a classic feeling with the, with the Clementi, and he had lots of things to think about there, he was working with all the chords that we showed you earlier.

David Greenberg And in the different inversions.

Guy Duckworth And you put on a Clementi ending. All right. That goes quite well for you. In the different inversions, and he dared to, since we have a triad with most of our chords, there are three possible positions for it. So he dared to change positions of all of his chords in his left hand, and he got quite complicated and intricate.

Studs Terkel How many levels were you thinking of, David, this is, now that Dr. Duckworth has mentioned this, there are about three or four different challenges involved all

Guy Duckworth at one time, weren't they? Yes, indeed, and they occurred simultaneously.

David Greenberg You mean, the different

Guy Duckworth positions of the chords. Yes, that would be one. What else were you thinking about?

David Greenberg The--well, I don't think--you know, I played one--

Guy Duckworth You might help

David Greenberg out, Scott. Trill and then--

Guy Duckworth What else would you be thinking about as you improvise?

David Greenberg The melody.

Guy Duckworth The melody.

Darrah Cloud The melody and--

Scott MacMillan The broken chords.

David Greenberg The broken chords.

Guy Duckworth Okay, we did that, we did that.

Darrah Cloud And kind of thinking of the composer and,

Guy Duckworth or the piece that you're playing. That had to be in mind all the time, that feeling, the

David Greenberg Clementi. And then, of course, the end. So about four or five different aspects in your mind at the same time as you were improvising. He had to think in the key of F, he had some difficulty remembering B flat, and that is important to keep in mind. All right, Scott, let's hear what you've done after Tchaikovsky now. Now we come to the romantic. Yes, now we have the romantic. Scott, the romantic. Do We have any music here? The shifting of the pianos. And in the meantime, the two colleagues of Scott, Darrah and David, I suppose, will be sort of playing in the air. Yes, listening very carefully to-- Oh, they'd be the critics, too. Yes. Oh, I said, "David, will you and Darrah offer your critique of what Scott is doing?" This is a very important part of our class, is this building of a listening procedure. Listening. Now, talk about Tchaikovsky, Scott. Well, mainly, you've got two notes in the left hand, and two notes in the right hand, and it's really chords and melody. So, show us how we have harmonized "America", show Mr. Terkel. You mean, just the way we always do? Yes. [plays piano] So, we have three notes, go ahead, three notes in the left hand, one in the right, it's easier to see the chord this way and now he's going to play it after Tchaikovsky, and he's going to put two notes in the right hand, two in the left, it's more difficult to see now. Okay. Thank you. And, so, splitting up the chord in that way we call "four-part

Guy Duckworth

Studs Terkel So about four or five different aspects in your mind at the same time as you were

Guy Duckworth improvising. He had to think in the key of F, he had some difficulty remembering B flat, and that is important to keep in mind. All right, Scott, let's hear what you've done after Tchaikovsky now. Yes, now we have the romantic. Scott, the romantic. Do We have any music here? The shifting of the pianos. And in the meantime, the two colleagues of Scott, Darrah and David, I suppose, will be sort of playing in the air.

Studs Terkel

Guy Duckworth Yes, now we have the romantic. Scott, the romantic. Do We have any music here?

Studs Terkel Now we come to the romantic. The shifting of the pianos. And in the meantime, the two colleagues of Scott, Darrah and David, I suppose, will be sort of playing in the air.

Guy Duckworth Yes, listening very carefully to--

Studs Terkel Oh, they'd be

Guy Duckworth

Studs Terkel the critics, too. Yes. Oh, I said, "David, will you and Darrah offer your critique of what Scott is doing?"

Guy Duckworth This is a very important part of our class, is this building of a listening procedure.

Studs Terkel Listening.

Guy Duckworth Now, talk about Tchaikovsky, Scott.

Scott MacMillan Well, mainly, you've got two notes in the left hand, and two notes in the right hand, and it's really chords and melody.

Guy Duckworth So, show us how we have harmonized "America", show Mr.

Scott MacMillan

Guy Duckworth Terkel. You mean, just the way we always do? Yes.

Scott MacMillan [plays piano]

Guy Duckworth The ending there, the rhythm of the melody. So, we have three notes, go ahead, three notes in the left hand, one in the right, it's easier to see the chord this way and now he's going to play it after Tchaikovsky, and he's going to put two notes in the right hand, two in the left, it's more difficult to see now. Okay. Thank you. And, so, splitting up the chord in that way we call "four-part chorale writing," really is getting to the point of freshman theory in college, where they can see chords split between two voices, and write the Bach chorale kind of work.

Studs Terkel By the way, as you're saying this, Dr. Duckworth, it's interesting, the level on which our 11-year-old friends here are approaching music would be equivalent in this within, without, you know, drawing diagrams, equivalent to that would be freshmen in college music.

Guy Duckworth We're approaching this work right now, yes.

Studs Terkel Well, what--

Guy Duckworth As you are doing that, and your feet were moving, you were swaying getting the rhythm of it, earlier you, when Dr. Duckworth said something to me about gestalt, did you dig what he was putting down? I say this, no, we were talking earlier about something, well, it's basically what you were saying, Darrah, about there's music in the air, I mean, that is, he was telling me this privately, that he teaches music to you guys as though it's overall life, it's not just one note, but song and your body's involved and your thoughts are involved, your imagination's involved, and, so, it's the overall design. How do you feel about it? Do you feel it's too difficult for you? Do you like it? Yeah, it is. It's a challenge against older kids that are playing different things than us, maybe even lower things than us. It's a lot different than these other piano teachers. I mean, they teach you how to learn a song, and then when you, and then when you quit piano or something, you don't, you don't know how to, even start a song. I mean, that's the thing about your theory is, I mean, the steps, skips, and repeats, we know how to learn how to play a song, and then my mother, she can't, she can hardly transpose, it's real hard, but that's the thing about, she knows steps, skips and repeats, [unintelligible]. That's your mother. Well, the way I'd compare it, would be, my hobby is horseback riding, and we had a horse at the stable-- She's a good rider, she's received prizes, too. There's horse at the stable named Liberty, and many people were scared to ride him, because he was a very hard horse to ride, and the idea of this, of the owner of the stable, to give them this horse, was to be a challenge, to see if they can control him, and it's the same thing with a piece. See if you can control a piece, and it's a challenge to see if you can do this. We feel very strongly here, Studs, that if there has to be a sacrifice between product and process of learning, we're going to sacrifice product. We're going to be sure that these kids know how to learn, and this we know they'll keep with them, whereas sometimes just to memorize a piece is not retained. So it comes to the question of process, this word of your knowing what you're learning and you're listening, now, David, you and Darrah, our equestrian as well as seer of storms, you know, were listening to Scott, and do you have comments, as you were hearing Scott, you know, meld Tchaikovsky to, weld Tchaikovsky to "America", you saw the challenge he was facing, weren't you? Have you tried it this way, have you tried to work out the Tchaikovsky with "America", David? Not, no, I haven't. Have you tried it, Darrah, to know what problems you might be drawing up against? Well, I've gotten too [vigorous?], but I really haven't-- Well, this might be a very good project for us, is to see that the, each one of us, first, so Scott would play after Clementi now and after Bach where David would share Darrah's and Scott's performances, were not, so we'll know more of what the other guy's up against, and then our listening is going to be all the better. I remember we began, the program opened, you were sort of improvising, fooling around, or as jazzmen would say, "noodling Bartok." All right. Scott, now we've not done this, this is going to be right off the cuff for you, off the cuff. So this will be experimental? Right. Okay. Now, Bartok, what was his [unintelligible] that we played when we started the program? The [unintelligible]. Fifths, on fifths, and what scale are we working in? Do you--do you know this? For Bartok. D minor diminished? Okay, here is D minor. [plays piano] Now, what scale do we use? But centered around D, though. We ended on D, started--let's see. You play the melody a bit, David, and find out your scale. This may have been a [unintelligible] to do this because this is out of the blue. Not at all, this is very good, this is proof of something here. Okay, you played the complete scale from D to D. Spell it, class. It's D, E, F, G, A, B, C, and D. All right. What would minor be if it were on D, Darrah? If the B flat would be minor, what would it be major? The key? Major would be [plays piano]. Okay, and how many sharps then for D? Two. Okay. So This is not major or minor, this is Dorian. Dorian? Dorian. The Dorian scale. All right. Now. What would it be on--well, let's play "America" in D, Dorian. Darrah, you start it. Just play the tune. [plays piano] Okay. [Unintelligible] David. [plays piano] Okay, and now we have kind of an ancient or antique sound for "America", now Scott, you put fifths to this, Have to play anything? See, let's see what happens. Okay. Give us an introduction. The same thing? Play anything you want, just give us an introduction. [plays piano] We have auditions each quarter, and the auditions for winter quarter are after December 1. If anyone interested would please call my studio, would my telephone number be appropriate? Sure. Four-nine-two, five-four-four-two, after December 1, then an audition will be arranged, and we hear everyone. Well, quite obviously, as Darrah would say, and [at the college?] say, "Music is in the air," with the approach of Guy Duckworth in teaching piano, and as--obviously, it's more than teaching piano, it's teaching a certain aspect of music and connection with life and freedom, that where you people see it? What do we say, let's bang away at the piano as a sort of summing up. Okay. Let's play Bartok. [pianos playing]

Darrah Cloud

Scott MacMillan Yeah, it is.

David Greenberg It's a challenge against older kids that are playing different things than us, maybe even lower things than us. It's a lot different than these other piano teachers. I mean, they teach you how to learn a song, and then when you, and then when you quit piano or something, you don't, you don't know how to, even start a song. I mean, that's the thing about your theory is, I mean, the steps, skips, and repeats, we know how to learn how to play a song, and then my mother, she can't, she

Studs Terkel can hardly transpose, it's real hard, but that's the thing about, she knows steps, skips and repeats, [unintelligible]. That's your mother.

Darrah Cloud As you are doing that, and your feet were moving, you were swaying getting the rhythm of it, earlier you, when Dr. Duckworth said something to me about gestalt, did you dig what he was putting down? I say this, no, we were talking earlier about something, well, it's basically what you were saying, Darrah, about there's music in the air, I mean, that is, he was telling me this privately, that he teaches music to you guys as though it's overall life, it's not just one note, but song and your body's involved and your thoughts are involved, your imagination's involved, and, so, it's the overall design. Well, the way I'd compare it, would be, my hobby is horseback riding, and we had a horse at the stable--

Guy Duckworth She's a good rider,

Darrah Cloud she's received prizes, too. There's horse at the stable named Liberty, and many people were scared to ride him, because he was a very hard horse to ride, and the idea of this, of the owner of the stable, to give them this horse, was to be a challenge, to see if they can control him, and it's the same thing with a piece. See if you can control a piece, and it's a challenge to see if you can do this.

Guy Duckworth We feel very strongly here, Studs, that if there has to be a sacrifice between product and process of learning, we're going to sacrifice product. We're going to be sure that these kids know how to learn, and this we know they'll keep with them, whereas sometimes just to memorize a piece is not retained.

Studs Terkel So it comes to the question of process, this word of your knowing what you're learning and you're listening, now, David, you and Darrah, our equestrian as well as seer of storms, you know, were listening to Scott, and do you have comments, as you were hearing Scott, you know, meld Tchaikovsky to, weld Tchaikovsky to "America", you saw the challenge he was facing, weren't you?

Guy Duckworth Have you tried it this way, have you tried to work out the Tchaikovsky with "America", David?

David Greenberg Not, no, I haven't.

Guy Duckworth Have you tried it, Darrah, to know what problems you might be drawing up against?

Darrah Cloud Well, I've gotten too [vigorous?], but I really

Guy Duckworth The air is music. I like that. I think this is a challenge. haven't-- Well, this might be a very good project for us, is to see that the, each one of us, first, so Scott would play after Clementi now and after Bach where David would share Darrah's and Scott's performances, were not, so we'll know more of what the other guy's up against, and then our listening is going to be all the better. I remember we began, the program opened, you were sort of improvising, fooling around, or as jazzmen would say, "noodling Bartok." All right. Scott, now we've not done this, this is going to be right off the cuff for you, off the cuff. So this will be experimental? Right. Okay. Now, Bartok, what was his [unintelligible] that we played when we started the program? The [unintelligible]. Fifths, on fifths, and what scale are we working in? Do you--do you know this? For Bartok. D minor diminished? Okay, here is D minor. [plays piano] Now, what scale do we use? But centered around D, though. We ended on D, started--let's see. You play the melody a bit, David, and find out your scale. This may have been a [unintelligible] to do this because this is out of the blue. Not at all, this is very good, this is proof of something here. Okay, you played the complete scale from D to D. Spell it, class. It's D, E, F, G, A, B, C, and D. All right. What would minor be if it were on D, Darrah? If the B flat would be minor, what would it be major? The key? Major would be [plays piano]. Okay, and how many sharps then for D? Two. Okay. So This is not major or minor, this is Dorian. Dorian? Dorian. The Dorian scale. All right. Now. What would it be on--well, let's play "America" in D, Dorian. Darrah, you start it. Just play the tune. [plays piano] Okay. [Unintelligible] David. [plays piano] Okay, and now we have kind of an ancient or antique sound for "America", now Scott, you put fifths to this, and start an accompaniment, both hands, give us an introduction. Just put chords in the third note? Then I guess we should talk more about Bartok here. What--how did Bartok do his accompaniment? Fifths, up and down, does he go outside the Dorian scale? What happens when he does go outside of the Dorian scale? I mean, when he goes out, does he do anything with his touch? What are these marks right here? Accents. When he goes out. He accents when he goes out. So you have the privilege to go outside the Dorian scale and we're going to play the tune. All right? Let's try it. Have to play anything? See, let's see what happens. Okay. Give us an introduction. The same thing? Play anything you want, just give us an introduction. [plays piano] Ready? And. [plays piano] Thank you very much. I was thinking about this whole hour and I have learned a great deal, too. I suppose the question to ask Dr. Duckworth, how, here are three of your prized students, yet, I know many of your students have this approach. How do they enter the school? What makes them eligible? We have auditions each quarter, and the auditions for winter quarter are after December 1. If anyone interested would please call my studio, would my telephone number be appropriate? Sure. Four-nine-two, five-four-four-two, after December 1, then an audition will be arranged, and we hear everyone. Well, quite obviously, as Darrah would say, and [at the college?] say, "Music is in the air," with the approach of Guy Duckworth in teaching piano, and as--obviously, it's more than teaching piano, it's teaching a certain aspect of music and connection with life and freedom, that where you people see it? What do we say, let's bang away at the piano as a sort of summing up. Okay. Let's play Bartok. [pianos playing]

Studs Terkel Before I say goodbye, you know, to what has been a very rewarding hour for me in watching process at work, how you listen and play, how about some--"America" we haven't had Bartok yet, in "America", have we? As I say goodbye and thanking you very much to Dr. Duckworth, to Scott, to David and Darrah.

Guy Duckworth

Studs Terkel I remember we began,

Guy Duckworth the program opened, you were sort of improvising, fooling around, or as jazzmen would say, "noodling Bartok." All right. Scott, now we've not done this, this is going to be right off the cuff for you, off the cuff.

Studs Terkel So this will be experimental?

Guy Duckworth Right. Okay. Now, Bartok, what was his [unintelligible] that we played when we started the program?

Scott MacMillan The [unintelligible].

Guy Duckworth Fifths, on fifths, and what scale are we working in? Do you--do you know this? For Bartok. D minor diminished? Okay, here is D minor. [plays piano] Now, what scale do we use? But centered around D, though. We ended on D, started--let's see. You play the melody a bit, David, and find out your scale. Not at all, this is very good, this is proof of something here. Okay, you played the complete scale from D to D. Spell it, class. It's D, E, F, G, A, B, C, and D. All right. What would minor be if it were on D, Darrah? If the B flat would be minor, what would it be major? The key? Major would be [plays piano]. Okay, and how many sharps then for D? Two. Okay. So This is not major or minor, this is Dorian. Dorian? Dorian. The Dorian scale. All right. Now. What would it be on--well, let's play "America" in D, Dorian. Darrah, you start it. Just play the tune. [plays piano] Okay. [Unintelligible] David. [plays piano] Okay, and now we have kind of an ancient or antique sound for "America", now Scott, you put fifths to this, Have to play anything? See, let's see what happens. Okay. Give us an introduction. The same thing? Play anything you want, just give us an introduction. We have auditions each quarter, and the auditions for winter quarter are after December 1. If anyone interested would please call my studio, would my telephone number be appropriate? Sure. Four-nine-two, five-four-four-two, after December 1, then an audition will be arranged, and we hear everyone. Well, quite obviously, as Darrah would say, and [at the college?] say, "Music is in the air," with the approach of Guy Duckworth in teaching piano, and as--obviously, it's more than teaching piano, it's teaching a certain aspect of music and connection with life and freedom, that where you people see it? What do we say, let's bang away at the piano as a sort of summing up. Okay. Let's play Bartok. [pianos playing]

Studs Terkel

Guy Duckworth Not at all, this is very good, this is proof of something here. Okay, you played the complete scale from D to D. Spell it, class. It's D, E, F, G, A, B, C, and D. All right. What would minor be if it were on D, Darrah? If the B flat would be minor, what would it be major?

Darrah Cloud The key? Major would be [plays piano].

Guy Duckworth Okay, and how

Darrah Cloud

Guy Duckworth many sharps then for D? Two. Okay. So This is not major or minor, this is Dorian.

Darrah Cloud Dorian?

Guy Duckworth Dorian. The Dorian scale. All right. Now. What would it be on--well, let's play "America" in D, Dorian. Darrah, you start it. Just play the tune.

Darrah Cloud [plays piano]

Guy Duckworth Okay. [Unintelligible] David.

David Greenberg [plays piano]

Guy Duckworth I think this is a challenge. This may have been a [unintelligible] to do this because this is out of the blue. Okay, and now we have kind of an ancient or antique sound for "America", now Scott, you put fifths to this, and start an accompaniment, both hands, give us an introduction. Have to play anything? See, let's see what happens. Okay. Give us an introduction. The same thing? Play anything you want, just give us an introduction. [plays piano] Ready? And. [plays piano] Thank you very much. I was thinking about this whole hour and I have learned a great deal, too. I suppose the question to ask Dr. Duckworth, how, here are three of your prized students, yet, I know many of your students have this approach. How do they enter the school? What makes them eligible? We have auditions each quarter, and the auditions for winter quarter are after December 1. If anyone interested would please call my studio, would my telephone number be appropriate? Sure. Four-nine-two, five-four-four-two, after December 1, then an audition will be arranged, and we hear everyone. Well, quite obviously, as Darrah would say, and [at the college?] say, "Music is in the air," with the approach of Guy Duckworth in teaching piano, and as--obviously, it's more than teaching piano, it's teaching a certain aspect of music and connection with life and freedom, that where you people see it? What do we say, let's bang away at the piano as a sort of summing up. Okay. Let's play Bartok. [pianos playing]

Scott MacMillan Just put chords in the third note?

Guy Duckworth

Scott MacMillan

Guy Duckworth Have to play anything? See, let's see what happens. Okay. Give us an introduction. We have auditions each quarter, and the auditions for winter quarter are after December 1. If anyone interested would please call my studio, would my telephone number be appropriate? Sure. Four-nine-two, five-four-four-two, after December 1, then an audition will be arranged, and we hear everyone. Well, quite obviously, as Darrah would say, and [at the college?] say, "Music is in the air," with the approach of Guy Duckworth in teaching piano, and as--obviously, it's more than teaching piano, it's teaching a certain aspect of music and connection with life and freedom, that where you people see it? What do we say, let's bang away at the piano as a sort of summing up. Okay. Let's play Bartok. [pianos playing]

Scott MacMillan The same thing?

Guy Duckworth This may have been a [unintelligible] to do this because this is out of the blue. Play anything you want, just give us an introduction.

Scott MacMillan I think this is a challenge. [plays piano]

Guy Duckworth Ready? And.

Scott MacMillan [plays piano]

Studs Terkel

Guy Duckworth We have auditions each quarter, and the auditions for winter quarter are after December 1. If anyone interested would please call my studio, would my telephone number be appropriate?

Studs Terkel Sure.

Guy Duckworth Four-nine-two, five-four-four-two, after December 1, then an audition will be arranged, and we hear everyone.

Studs Terkel Well, quite obviously, as Darrah would say, and [at the college?] say, "Music is in the air," with the approach of Guy Duckworth in teaching piano, and as--obviously, it's more than teaching piano, it's teaching a certain aspect of music and connection with life and freedom, that where you people see it? What do we say, let's bang

Guy Duckworth The air is music. I like that. I think this is a challenge. Before I say goodbye, you know, to what has been a very rewarding hour for me in watching process at work, how you listen and play, how about some--"America" we haven't had Bartok yet, in "America", have we? This may have been a [unintelligible] to do this because this is out of the blue. and start an accompaniment, both hands, give us an introduction. Just put chords in the third note? Then I guess we should talk more about Bartok here. What--how did Bartok do his accompaniment? Fifths, up and down, does he go outside the Dorian scale? What happens when he does go outside of the Dorian scale? I mean, when he goes out, does he do anything with his touch? What are these marks right here? Accents. When he goes out. He accents when he goes out. So you have the privilege to go outside the Dorian scale and we're going to play the tune. All right? Let's try it. The same thing? Play anything you want, just give us an introduction. [plays piano] Ready? And. [plays piano] Thank you very much. I was thinking about this whole hour and I have learned a great deal, too. I suppose the question to ask Dr. Duckworth, how, here are three of your prized students, yet, I know many of your students have this approach. How do they enter the school? What makes them eligible? away at the piano as a sort of summing up. Okay. Let's play Bartok. [pianos playing]

Studs Terkel

Guy Duckworth