>When Studs interviewed Simon Wiesenthal in 1976, he had already gained a formidable reputation as a Nazi Hunter. After spending the majority of the war being moved from one forced labor camp to another, Wiesenthal ended up at the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria new Linz. Severely ill from an amputated toe and a forced march from two other camps as the Soviets advanced through Poland and Austria, he was put on a death block. Fortunately for him, and the rest of the world he was able to survive from February until his liberation by American troops on May 5, 1945. Within weeks of his freedom, he had already begun putting together a list of Nazi names and working with allied troops to not only find and prosecute them, but also begin the reunification of as many displaced survivors as possible.

Today his work continues through the Simon Wiesenthal Center and the Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies. Although we’d like to think that all Nazi’s are gone we know this is untrue as a 93 year old SS sergeant is being prosecuted in Germany for accessory to murder for his role in the gas chamber deaths of 300,000 at Auschwitz.  While justice may be late in coming it may not have occurred at all if not for the efforts of survivors like Simon Wiesenthal.  With the Pope Francis’ recent recognition of the Palestinian state and Israels Prime Minister making waves in the United States it is interesting to hear what Simon and Studs had to say about these subjects back in 1976 when they were hot button issues, just as they are today.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,